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Plan to Frankenstein Sparkie to 249 grams

Binder

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Aug 5, 2018
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Well, I have no doubt about passing the exam. It's the fees, the unnecessary questions that will never impact us hobbyist that are just wanting some cool arial photos, while hiking or at the beach with no civilians around. So, since this 250+ grams thing is a magic number that TC feels makes a drone that much safer than one 302 grams (huh?), I'm going to see if I can reduce my Spark to 249 grams. I just ordered a 49 gram carbon fiber frame and will Frankenstein Sparkie into it and see what else I can trim off to make it 249 grams. I'll keep you posted!
 

rangemaster728

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Nov 30, 2017
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I couldn’t tell if you are in the USA or not...if you are hopefully you know that all the regulations still apply regarding max altitude, flight over people, airspace etc.

In the US the only thing the 249g limit gets you is NOT having to pay $5 - one time - to register yourself as a Recreational pilot.

If you’re in Canada it’s a very different story and an advantage.

EDIT: just checked your other posts....yup, the Canadian advantage lol...fly safe!
 

Florida Drone Supply

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Jul 3, 2017
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Not really sure why 249 seems to be the magic number, I'm betting once more companies try to do this, the rules will catch up.
 
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nilanjan118

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Oct 31, 2018
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Not really sure why 249 seems to be the magic number, I'm betting once more companies try to do this, the rules will catch up.
That's right. I have said this a lot of times now. It is only a matter of time before the UAV regulation authorities make the weight limit more stringent. In Japan, we already have the limit of 200g.
 

Roger S

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Apr 6, 2018
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Well, I have no doubt about passing the exam. It's the fees, the unnecessary questions that will never impact us hobbyist that are just wanting some cool arial photos, while hiking or at the beach with no civilians around. So, since this 250+ grams thing is a magic number that TC feels makes a drone that much safer than one 302 grams (huh?), I'm going to see if I can reduce my Spark to 249 grams. I just ordered a 49 gram carbon fiber frame and will Frankenstein Sparkie into it and see what else I can trim off to make it 249 grams. I'll keep you posted!
I wonder if it will increase the flight time significantly
 

PhantomFandom

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Jan 1, 2019
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Philadelphia
Not really sure why 249 seems to be the magic number, I'm betting once more companies try to do this, the rules will catch up.
hat's right. I have said this a lot of times now. It is only a matter of time before the UAV regulation authorities make the weight limit more stringent. In Japan, we already have the limit of 200g.
The number is (or should) not be random and magical. It is the weight at which the object falling as dead weight on a civilian would not cause anything other than a minor injury. Since the latest proposed rules are based on objective criteria for injury and they still left the weight at below 250 grams, then I believe it will not change.
 
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I B Spectre

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Aug 16, 2019
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589
I don't know if you've seen this YT video, but the author shows how he reduced his Spark to 249 grams so it would fall under the Micro Drone category in Canada. I don't recall him covering it, but it looks like he removed some of the plastic from the motor arm webs. Of course there is no top cover, so it's open to the elements. He also removed the heat sinks and claimed it would not be a problem provided you got the rotors turned-up within 3 minutes. He didn't show a good look at the battery after some serious plastic removal. It appeared to be affixed to the aircraft by plastic or rubber bands.

Modifying a Spark to less than 250 grams
 

GeoM1

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Jan 23, 2019
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Not really sure why 249 seems to be the magic number, I'm betting once more companies try to do this, the rules will catch up.
Well I’m sure you agree that a flying weight number had to be selected. Less than 250g was the number. Makes sense to me.
 

I B Spectre

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Aug 16, 2019
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589
Well I’m sure you agree that a flying weight number had to be selected. Less than 250g was the number. Makes sense to me.
Sure, but what criteria determined that 250 gram was the number? There is information that it was based on 1960s nuclear fallout that "led to the lethality curve showing the probability of death after getting hit by an object carrying a specific amount of kinetic energy". The following link is an interesting read and, coupled with the test data discussed in post #8 above, calls into question the arbitrary decision focusing on 250 grams.

How 1960s nuclear fallout math influences todays drone regs
 
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Mark M

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Jun 14, 2018
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57
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119
Been eyeing up the Mavic Mini for weeks, but not sure the magical 249g is a good thing. Weight helps provide stability, like ballast water on a ship.

Ever see how twitchy the MM is on takeoff and hovering? The think is shaking like a epileptic bartender. Compared to my Spark and my Mavic Pro that both remain stable hovering in the wind.
 

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