Welcome DJI Spark Pilot!
Jump in and join our free Spark community today!
Sign up

RID ideas starting to show up

I B Spectre

Well-Known Member
Join
Aug 16, 2019
Messages
898
As the clock ticks onward to Sept. 16th, I've been scanning the net to see if RID-related stuff is popping up. Two requirements I think most UAS pilots demand is 1) FAA compliance and 2) affordability. Vlogger Ken Heron thinks the RID requirement for Recreational UAS pilots will go the way of CB radio licensing. Could be, but that took quite some time to come about. Part 107 operators will still need to comply.

If anyone is interested in RID for legacy drones, I can post links to articles and reviews so long as I'm not violating this site's policies.
 
RID??? Never heard of it. :rolleyes:
 
I got to thinking about the Bluetooth operation of the RID devices and the effect, if any, on the SPARK.

The little Wi-Fi Spark doesn't like stray BT signals.

An OTG cable may help but would be interesting to know before purchasing a device to be compliant.


.
 
  • Like
Reactions: graywoulf
It also depends on where the RID module has to be mounted. It can't be mounted on top because it will block the GPS signal from the GPS module that sits just under the top cover. On the bottom, it could block the sensors. It seems to be a no win situation. I think I'll pass on buying a RID module.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tglass0000
CubePilot's product measures 25mm (0.098") x 13.75mm (0.54") x 3.5mm (0.14") at 10gr (0.35oz)

Dronetag BS measures 17mm (0.66") x 14mm (0.55") x 5mm (0.19") at 3gr (0.35oz)

For comparison, my Flytron strobe is 20mm (0.79" x 16mm (0.63") x 8mm (0.31") at 4.5gr (0.16oz) and attachs to the RH aft prop guard with 3m Dual Lock velcro, so unless the module has specific placement requirements, I'd expect it could be attached similarly.

There's not a lot to choose from at this time. The DroneTag BS says they've received FAA approval while CubePilot has not. I'm hoping to see YT reviews on real world performance as more products are introduced. The aeromodeling community is watching all this with intense interest and represents a sizeable market.

I've got a question about how the module interfaces with the Spark. The DroneBeacon Db120 shows it velcro attached on top of a Mavic-size UAV and it communicates with the drone via wifi on power-up. Due to its size, I think it'd take something more than the Spark. IMO it's priced too high for a drone that's been out of production this long. I do like the simplicity which is the key to avoiding user frustration with demanding installation procedures. One thing I did find interesting is how the firmware lets you set parameters that prevent drone tracker phone apps from seeing the pilot and drone locations. The demonstrator says it's legal and both government and law enforcement have equipment which still displays pilot and drone locations. Proper authorities are one thing, but neither a busy-body nor a thug with nefarious intentions does not need to know my whereabouts.
 
As the clock ticks onward to Sept. 16th, I've been scanning the net to see if RID-related stuff is popping up. Two requirements I think most UAS pilots demand is 1) FAA compliance and 2) affordability. Vlogger Ken Heron thinks the RID requirement for Recreational UAS pilots will go the way of CB radio licensing. Could be, but that took quite some time to come about. Part 107 operators will still need to comply.

If anyone is interested in RID for legacy drones, I can post links to articles and reviews so long as I'm not violating this site's policies.
Yes! I’m hoping to keep flying my Spark! Thanks in advance.
 
The YT video I talked about in my previous post shows a "hack" (seems every idea these days is referred to as a hack) that is demonstrated using a BlueMark Beacon Db120 RID module and prevents anyone using the Dronescanner or OpenDroneID phone apps from seeing the location of the controller/pilot by simply changing the default config settings in the Beacon's firmware.

RID configured against drone tracking phone apps

A lot of posts on the internet objecting to RID allowing anyone with a phone app to locate you. This is the first I've seen that allows you to reconfig the firmware. I hope more companies will do this to protect the user's privacy and safety. The current advertised price is 129 Euros ($142.43), so it's still a bit pricey for me.
 
Last edited:
A lot of posts on the internet objecting to RID allowing anyone with a phone app to locate you. This is the first I've seen that allows you to reconfig the firmware. I hope more companies will do this to protect the user's privacy and safety.

But can authorities still use the RID transmissions ?
This is the primary reason for it being brought in.
If the signals can't be read by private folk with a phone app, how do authorities still pick it up if they have seen or had a report of dangerous flying ?
 
I don't know what tech assets they supposedly have, but the guy in the video says the authorities have equipment that can provide that information. Something along the lines of DJI's Aeroscope designed for large (i.e., airports or sensitive sites), but scaled for portability. Can't remember a system I saw demonstrated on YT a couple of days ago that does this. Unlike GPS spoofing, this is not something that degrades or interferes with the authorities ability to know the who/what/where in the airspace. The one major objection I read being voiced is the providing pilot location to anyone with a phone app. Remote ID will either be validated by the community of users or rejected.
 
I guess authorities don't want to be buying expensive gear to be able to read regular app hacked signals.
Aeroscope certainly has had its day, well at least the mobile version is no longer available, the fixed model for airports etc is still there for those places authorities deem necessary.

Yes, it seems that US drone pilots are raising mainly general populous ability to know where an (often) expensive drone is being flown, and the pilots location, and with that their concern that it could lead to property theft, possibly with violence.
Sad to say that this can be considered such an issue / risk . . . blown out of proportion or possibly some urban areas it could be a valid concern.

Secondary is so called Karens (or Kens ?) being able to create more confrontational situations.

I know that some pilots in the FPV drone game were concerned about remote ID and how it might affect them, but they seem to have settled in with it in a neutral way.
Many do fly in small groups for spotter requirements, so their concerns with theft risk is probably less of a worry.
There'd be a lot flying outside the legal requirements too I'm sure.

Anyway, time will tell if such concerns are valid, and I am pretty sure that watching the US will be a good reflection of what will likely come to other countrys soon enough, the UK, EU, Australia, New Zealand, will likely all follow eventually.
 
During my regular online check to see what is currently available, I did a search for "Remote id broadcast module for drones". For purposes of most off-the-shelf quadcopter users, I focused only on those that are self powered, contain their own GPS unit and simply attach to your drone. I ignore devices that have to be wired into the drone or require additional components (i.e. antennae).

Unfortunately, the $39 USD CubePilot employs wire harness interface since it is not self-powered, so it doesn't work for my purposes. The next closest product that meets the criteria is the $139 USD DroneBeacon Db120 described in my earlier post and demonstrated in the aforementioned YT link. From there, the price jumps to about $200 and beyond.

It remains to be seen if more products hit the market prior to Sept. 16, but as of now the selection is limited and pricey. It's noteworthy that, even though staying under the 250 gram threshold does not require RID at this time, any drone manufactured since Sept. of 2022 is required to have it. It cannot be turned-off and any attempt to do so results in the UAS inability to take off as shown in Ken Heron's YT video. We'll see what happens over the next month and a half.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Spark 317
Did my periodic online check to see if there were any new broadcast RID modules. I'm not seeing anything new that would be of interest to most commercially available legacy drones. The prices are way too steep and, because it is such a niche market, economies of scale may not be beneficial...at least not in the near future. I think the regulators expect that UAS users will replace their drones over time as new models with more advanced performance/features hit the market and all drones will have standard RID built-in, even those under 250 grams. So even if you go that route and don't have to register (at present) the UAS, it will still have RID and you cannot disable it. Some DJI drones were built with RID in mind even before Sept. 2022 and activates upon firmware update. Ken Heron demonstrated this in a YT video and the drone would not takeoff after the update if he tried to turn it off.

I read an online post about a guy that supposedly built a broadcast RID unit for like $38 in parts, but it had not gone through the approval process by the FCC or the FAA. He said they would likely disapprove it due to its open-source programming which might allow it to be "modified".

It appears to me that, while we will have to wait to see if any company will present a more affordable solution, it will require that you:
1. Fork over the money for a module that may cost as much or more than your drone is worth
2. Stay grounded until/if more affordable products are made available
3. Operate illegally and risk a great deal of trouble

At least you only need to buy one RID module IF you're flying recreationally and you can move the module between other drones you own. Unfortunately, those operating under Part 107 will have to buy a module for each drone they intend to fly. We've still got a little over a month before the hammer falls on Sept. 16th, so let's keep our fingers crossed that it'll all work out.
 
Sorry to say, but no new RID products reported that I could find as of today. I'd hoped to see movement now that we're on the runup to the Sept. 16th deadline. Would be nice if DJI came up with an addon solution since some of their more popular drones don't have onboard capability. but I guess they'd rather see you buy a newer model that has it already. I'll keep scanning the net and hope something pops soon.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Spark 317
Sorry to say, but no new RID products reported that I could find as of today. I'd hoped to see movement now that we're on the runup to the Sept. 16th deadline. Would be nice if DJI came up with an addon solution since some of their more popular drones don't have onboard capability. but I guess they'd rather see you buy a newer model that has it already. I'll keep scanning the net and hope something pops soon.

You nailed it. 👍

My Spark doesn't fly very well since my incident a while back and my Mavic Air 2 is on the list for a potential upgrade at the the end of the year, past the deadline of September. 🤔


I really don't want to purchase another aircraft in the future, but... it is what it is, so they say.

.
 
  • Like
Reactions: I B Spectre
Here's what a quick google search rendered today (in alphabetical order at lowest prices I could find):

AeroPing Drone Remote ID Module - $191.01

BlueMark DroneBeacon Db 120 - $139.00

DroneTag Beacon - $218.90

DroneTag Mini Universal - $328.90

Uavionix pingRID - $299.99

All say they're FAA approved and list BlueTooth 4 & 5 protocol, all are powered by an onboard rechargeable battery.
 
Hi all Spark pilots I have my sparks for for many years and have gone through 6 batteries and the final 2 are just showing signs of fail . I have looked for new ones but but prices are $200 secondhand are $100 so I have bought a secondhand mini 2. But the cable from controller to my iPad it to short any one know if I can buy longer one and where. Happy flying and best regards Engie
 
I have no experience with the Mini 2, so I can't offer any ideas, but a quick google search for DJI Mini 2 OTG cable shows several from various sources available in different lenghs.

Amazon is showing OEM Spark batteries from a couple of vendors for $79 . Nothing says they're in used condition, but nothing specifically says they're new either. The reviews look good. Hope this helps, good luck!
 
Last edited:
I have no experience with the Mini 2, so I can't offer any ideas, but a quick google search for DJI Mini 2 OTG cable shows several from various sources available in different lenghs.

Amazon is showing OEM Spark batteries from a couple of vendors for $79 . Nothing says they're in used condition, but nothing specifically says they're new either. The reviews look good. Hope this helps, good luck!
Thanks mate I did see some secondhand and asked if they would be able to show some history, answer was how. Regards. Engie.
 

New Posts

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
14,598
Messages
118,812
Members
17,999
Latest member
jstata